Kirk Douglas imprisoned as the titular character from Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus (1960). Perhaps one of the heroes Mitry discusses.

Kirk Douglas imprisoned as the titular character from Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus (1960). Perhaps one of the heroes Mitry discusses.

A perfect description of the magical transportive results of narrative films and the effects many narrative filmmakers strive to achieve (including myself). Some will find this problematic, a further argument against suture. Yet, I find this a most eloquent description of why I want to make narrative films.

Here's the excerpt: 

"I am everywhere at once, thanks to the mobility of the camera and the multiplicity of the shots. All I have to do is take part in the game and let myself go. I am 'swept along.' Not just captivated but literally 'captured,' absorbed into the strange and fascinating space which the screen reveals. The hero of the film is suddenly closer to me than the fellow in the next seat - so much so that he nearly touches me. I closely follow the movements and changes of position of this character or that; I move, see, act with them, like them and at the same time as them; I take part in their drama (which temporarily becomes my own). I am no longer an audience member but well and truly an 'actor.' I know that I am in the cinema but I feel to be in a world presented to me through my eyes, a world which I experience 'physically' by identifying with one or other of the characters of the drama - with all of them in turn. That is the same as saying that in the cinema I am both inside and outside the action, inside the space and outside it. With the power of ubiquity I am everywhere and nowhere."

- Jean Mitry | The Aesthetics and Psychology of the Cinema | Chapter II: The Film Image

 

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